Cafe Gratitude Magazine - Best Cooking Channel

Try at home Mexican rolls for breakfast instead of ordering online

Ingredients:

  • one large green bell pepper, chopped (1 cup)
  • one large onion, chopped (1 cup)
  • 1 3/4 cups nonfat egg product (from 2 8 oz boxes)
  • 1/3 cup non-fat milk (skim)
  • 1/8 teaspoon pepper
  • 4 nonfat flour tortillas (8 to 10 inches)
  • 1/2 cup 2-ounce grated Cheddar cheese, grated
  • 1/4 cup chopped tomato
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh coriander

Instructions:

1. Spray a 10-inch skillet with cooking spray; heat over medium heat. Add the pepper and onion; cover and cook 4 to 6 minutes, stirring occasionally, until
ingredients are tender.

2. In a medium bowl, mix together the egg product, milk, and pepper until well combined. Spray vegetables and skillet with cooking spray. Pour the egg product
mixture over the vegetables; cook until firm, stirring occasionally.

3. Meanwhile, heat tortillas as directed on the package.

4. To serve, place hot tortillas on individual plates. Spoon the scrambled egg into the center of each tortilla. Top with cheese, tomato, and coriander. Roll the
tortillas tightly.

Best South East Asian Restaurant in Vietnam for Thai Foods

I have just now started to experiment with new lines of products to sell at our family store. Of course, I am looking for things that people will want, but which might not be easy to find at other locations. For example, I have located some Vietnamese products made by a company called Tan Hiep Phat and I was thinking that there might be some market for them because the place across the street from us is a Vietnamese or Southeast Asian restaurant. In fact, they seem to mix up the cuisine native to the region, especially since there is not as large of interest in Vietnamese food as there is in Thai food. Of course, the problem is that I am not really sure how much oversight goes into the production of these sorts of products in Vietnam.

You have to worry about some person having an allergy and suing you, or perhaps just claiming that they had some sort of bad reaction to the stuff. I have sampled the stuff and I wonder what to make of it really. From what I can tell it seems to be a body cleansing elixir, but I am not sure because the translation is difficult and so I am looking for more information before I take the plunge. Of course, it needs to have some sort of English language labeling to sell it in this country. I somewhat doubt that it is legal to sell stuff in this country that does not have the nutritional information displayed on it, obviously in a format which Americans would be able to read. I doubt that the FDA goes around checking the shelves of little stores for that sort of thing, but obviously people could report you for this sort of thing if they had nothing better to do.

Best Chinese Restaurants in the U.S.

 

You’ll find restaurants setting the bar higher in immigrant enclaves like New York City’s Flushing neighborhood and California’s San Gabriel Valley, but also in Vermont, Chicago, and Salt Lake City. Some are family-owned, hole-in-the-wall joints.

New York has relatively little Hong Kong influence.

1. Koi Palace, Daly City, California: Hong Kong-style restaurant specializing in dim sum at lunchtime and Hong Kong-style seafood at dinner.

2. Peter Chang Cafe, Richmond, VA: The bold, exotic flavors will leave your tongue numb, especially if you opt for the Hot & Numbing Hot Pot, a combo of seafood, chicken, beef, and veggies submerged in a fiery red sauce. The oversize portions are meant to be shared and arrive on an as-ready basis

3. Ping Pang Pong, Las Vegas: you’ll find regional specialties from across China, from dim sum served on pushcarts (Cantonese) to salt-and-pepper frog legs (Sichuan) and double-braised scallop hot pot (found throughout China).

4. Elite Restaurant, Monterey Park, California: Serving dim sum off the menu and Hong Kong-style seafood. While dim sum carts are viewed by many as a more interesting experience, dim sum off the menu that is cooked to order provides a fresher and higher quality product.

5. Lunasa, Alhambra, California: Hong Kong-style seafood restaurant. Innovative dim sum items include foie gras dim sum.

6. Lao Sze Chuan, Chicago: Yet people continue to wait in line for a table at this Sichuan spot, known for its extraordinary spiciness and fearless dishes like sour pickle and pork stomach soup and Peking-style duck tongue

7. Gourmet Dumpling House, Boston: Though the menu leans toward Taiwanese and coastal cuisines, the soup dumplings filled with pork, crabmeat, and a delicate broth and the scallion pancakes are not to be missed, you’ll also find skilfully executed Sichuan dishes, like the sliced fish, revered for its the perfect balance of heat and tenderness.

8. Din Tai Fung, Arcadia, California: Shanghai-style restaurant

9. Yank Sing, San Francisco, California

10. What! The food differs according to Chef, similarly, taste differs for each and everyone in the world. So we left the 10th option for you to decide as per your own taste.